EXERCISES LOWER BACK

TRAINING AT YOUR NATURAL PACE Maintaining a performance mind-set in training requires that you give close and consistent attention to the performance-relevant metrics of time and pace and push performance-irrelevant metrics such as heart rate into the background. This guideline even applies to the easier runs that should predominate in your training, as they do for nearly all serious competitive runners. You don’t need a heart-rate monitor to keep from running too hard when you’re supposed to run easy. You can simply go by feel and run at your natural pace, or the pace you fall into automatically when you go for a typical moderate, steady run of a certain predetermined distance or duration (5 miles, 45 minutes, or whatever)a format that probably accounts for 90 percent of all runs performed daily by the worldwide population of runners. Yet while the intensity of these runs is best controlled by feel, it is still helpful to monitor pace in them. Each runner’s natural pace changes over time as fitness is gained or lost, and it even changes from day to day based on how the runner feelsa factor influenced by fatigue from preceding training, above all. Therefore, monitoring the pace of runs performed by feel at natural pace provides valuable information about fitness and fatigue levels. What determines a runner’s natural running pace? Exercise scientists have made few efforts to answer this question, and the answers that have been proposed are unsatisfactory. In a 2001 study, researchers from the University of Udine, Italy, tested the hypothesis that natural running pace is determined by blood lactate level.3 They expected to find that natural running pace would correspond to the maximal lactate steady state, or the fastest pace a runner could sustain without lactate accumulating to a concentration that would cause fatigue. Eight recreational runners were first tested for their lactate threshold speed and heart rate and were then asked to run for 1 hour at their natural pace. On average, the runners did complete the 1-hour run at approximately their maximal lactate steady state; however, while there was a lot of variation in the individual lactate steady state speeds among the eight subjects (some were much faster than others), there was significantly less variation in pace levels maintained in the 1-hour run, a finding that led the study’s authors to conclude that “besides the need of avoiding lactate accumulation in blood, other factors must be involved in the choice of speed in running.”Strengthen Your Lower Back | Fit Fathers Bestcelebritystyle

EXERCISES LOWER BACK

Good and Bad Exercises for Low Back Pain With Pictures Bestcelebritystyle

EXERCISES LOWER BACK

Bulging disc lower back exercises – best exercises. Bestcelebritystyle

EXERCISES LOWER BACK

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