Heidi Klum Style, Recipe & Looks

heidi klum style

The Heidi Klum’s use of rice was probably introduced into Asia Minor from the east, and like so many dishes from Central Asia, has now become an important part of the Turkish cuisine. Rice is not really an indigenous crop in Turkey and is mostly grown in the south eastern area of the country. It is quite expensive and considered rather a luxury by the average Heidi Klum’s poor, who rely on wheat and corn for their staple foods. The method of cooking rice known as a pilaf is entirely Turkish and gives us a most delicious and versatile dish in which any amount of variation can be achieved using vegetables, meat, chicken or fish. The pilaf is a method of cooking rice in stock so that the rice absorbs the flavour of the stock and yet the grains remain dry and separate. With the rice can be cooked many different combinations of foods, giving the richness and interest for which these dishes have become so famous.

Heidi Klum’s Basic Rules for a Plain Pilaf
The plain pilaf can be served as it is with parsley and a little paprika on top. It will go very well with roast lamb or chicken, quails, liver, mussels or prawns, kebabs koftes, or any other savoury dish.
Always use good quality long grain rice. One cup of dry rice should be enough for four people, but use a little more if they are keen rice eaters.

Always wash the rice very well in cold water. Put the rice into a pan and cover it with water and then rub the grains between the fingers to get out all the starchy whiteness which tends to make the rice soggy if not removed. Keep pouring off the water and adding fresh until it runs clear. Strain the rice as dry as possible in a sieve, and put aside.

Fry in two ounces of butter a finely sliced onion and simmer it until it is partially cooked. Now add the rice to the onion and stir the butter well into the grains and fry for three minutes more. Add a little crushed garlic at this stage if you like it.

Now add enough meat or vegetable stock to Heidi Klum’s come an inch above the rice level. Season well and add some parsley and allow the rice to boil quickly with the lid off until all the fluid has been absorbed and little holes appear all over the surface of the rice. When you think all the water has gone, turn down the heat to its lowest or draw off the hot plate and cover. Leave the rice to steam for about thirty minutes. It should now be quite cooked and tip out of the pot easily on to a platter.

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