KELLY STABLES STYLE 2015

It depends on my mood and where I’m going Cheekbones. I shadow very lightly with a taupe brown color Above A smile supplies the finishing touch! I know that when I feel good, I look good and no amount of makeup or clothes can give me that! under my cheekbones. Easy does it. I love David Bowie, but that’s not the effect I’m going for! . Eyebrows.

New KELLY STABLES STYLE 2015

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A study published last year in The Journal of the American Medical Association showed that in standard anatomy texts, women were represented in 62 percent of the illustrations in the chapters on reproduction but in only 11 percent of the illustrations related to all other subjects. Janet Bickel, director of women’s programs for the Association of American Medical Colleges, says this reflects medicine’s traditional assumption “that women’s anatomy should be taught mainly in relation to their reproductive function.”
As a result, many physicians-in-train-ing, other than those in ob-gyn, fail to receive in-depth training in breast and pelvic exams. “Medical students start in year one to learn about ears, noses, throats and eyes, yet very few people die from diseases of these organs,” points out Dr. Levison. “The things that kill women the most aren’t taught early enough.”
With women now comprising more than 42 percent of medical students and expected to make up about a quarter of all practicing physicians within the next five years, a stronger focus on women’s health might seem a foregone conclusion. Yet as of 1994, women held only five percent of medical school department chairs, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.
“Nobody in government paid attention to women’s health until we had a critical mass of women in Congress and they started agitating,” points out Glenda Donoghue, M.D., convener of the recently formed National Academy on Women’s Health Medical Education. “Until we have proportionate numbers of women in leadership positions in medicine, we can never take for granted that women’s health will be taken into account.”
In the meantime, it’s up to all women as medical students, as consumers of medical care, as research volunteers and as active citizens to keep up the pressure for full integration of women’s health into all aspects of medical training and practice.
As long as the 70-kilo man remains the big man on medical school campuses, American women are not going to get the quality health care they need.

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